Monthly Archives: November 2008

Natureskills.com

So I found this really interesting website the other day. Actually, I find interesting websites a lot, but this one is definitely worth sharing:

http://www.natureskills.com/
It has lots of info on nature topics on it and offers a newsletter. The articles on it are written by people who have done the Kamana program, by people who have worked with Tom Brown Jr. and Jon Young, etc.
Seems very interesting indeed and covers “outdoor skills such as tracking, bird language, primitive skills, wilderness survival skills, wild foods and more!”

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Wildnisgabel

This will be in German. The pictures are pretty self-explanatory, though.

Hallo liebe Wildnisfreunde!
Wie versprochen hier endlich die Anleitung zur Wildnisgabel. Sie ist wirklich ruck-zuck gebaut – ich habe ca. 15 Minuten gebraucht.

Man nehme einen Stock

Man nehme einen Stock und schneide ihn auf die gewünschte Gabellänge zurecht. Hier habe ich schon einen Schnitt gemacht, um die Rinde vorsichtig abzunehmen

Hier hab ich die Rinde abgemacht. Sie ließ sich leider nicht in einem ganzen Stück abmachen

Hier hab ich die Rinde abgemacht. Sie ließ sich leider nicht in einem ganzen Stück abmachen und ich musste sie abkratzen

Man sollte möglichst versuchen, die Rinde als großes Stück abzulösen, damit man sie später verwenden kann, um den Stock zu verbinden (kommt später). Wenn das nicht klappt, nimmt man eben ein Stück Schnur.

Vom Ende der Gabel schneidet man ein kleines Stück ab, das braucht man gleich für Keile

Vom Ende der Gabel schneidet man ein kleines Stück ab, das braucht man gleich für Keile

Vom kleinen Stück schneidet man die runden Seiten ab, spaltet die Mitte und erhält zwei kleine Rechtecke

Vom kleinen Stück schneidet man die runden Seiten ab, spaltet die Mitte und erhält zwei kleine Rechtecke

Die Rechtecke spitzt man auf einer Seite in der Mitte zu, um Keile zu erhalten

Die Rechtecke spitzt man auf einer Seite in der Mitte zu, um Keile zu erhalten

Es ist günstig, die Spitze möglichst in der Mitte zu haben. Ich war faul und habe die Spitze ein wenig an der Seite – nicht schlimm, aber später sieht man, dass es nicht ganz so hübsch aussieht.

Man sucht sich nun ein Ende des Stocks aus, das das gabelige Ende sein soll. Dort macht man zwei kleine Einschnitte

Man sucht sich nun ein Ende des Stocks aus, das das gabelige Ende sein soll. Dort macht man zwei kleine Einschnitte

Jetzt nimmt man sich ein Stück Schnur... äh... oder sucht zumindest das Ende...

Jetzt nimmt man sich ein Stück Schnur... äh... oder sucht zumindest das Ende...

Passt auf, dass eure Schnurknäule nicht so aussehen! Es ist unnötiger Zeitverlust, das Ende zu suchen. Meine Katzen sahen das aber anders, als sie mit der Schnur gespielt haben…

...also, ein Stück Schnur...

...also, ein Stück Schnur...

...wird um das gabelige Ende gebunden.

...wird um das gabelige Ende gebunden.

Euer fertiges Gabelende wird etwa bis einen halben Zentimeter vor Schnur gehen. Also lasst genug Platz zwischen Ende und Schnur. Wenn ihr Rinde nehmt, könnt ihr die Schnur fixieren wie ich hier: Man schiebt das Ende beim Drumwickeln durch einige Windungen, so dass Schnur oder Rinde sich selbst festhalten.

Nun steckt ihr die Keile in die Einschnitte

Nun steckt ihr die Keile in die Einschnitte

Dann hämmert ihr die Keile nacheinander hinein

Dann hämmert ihr die Keile nacheinander hinein

Ich habe zum Hämmern die Rückseite meines Messers genommen. Ihr seht jetzt auch wofür die Schnur drumgebunden wurde: Sie verhindert, dass die Risse zu tief gehen und die Seite der Gabel abbricht, wenn ihr Keile hineintreibt.

So langsam sieht man, dass hier eine Gabel entsteht

So langsam sieht man, dass hier eine Gabel entsteht

So! Jetzt wird geschnitzt!

So! Jetzt wird geschnitzt!

Hier schaue ich mir die Gabel von der Seite an

Hier schaue ich mir die Gabel von der Seite an. Gabeln sind meistens oben etwas gebogen, also werde ich die schon gebogene Seite ausnutzen

Hier habe ich oben ein wenig abgenommt und die Zinken ein wenig zugespitzt

Hier habe ich oben ein wenig abgenommt und die Zinken ein wenig zugespitzt

Hier nochmal von der Seite

Hier nochmal von der Seite

Die Zinken sind noch spitzer

Die Zinken sind noch spitzer

Sehr gut!

Testurteil: Sehr gut!

Da meine Keile nicht ganz symmetrisch waren, habe ich jetzt zwischen Keil und Gabelstiel kleine Lücken.

Ansonsten ist die Gabel jetzt fertig. Meine erste Gabel ist mittlerweile mehr als zwei Jahre alt. Die Rinde, mit der ich sie umwickelt hatte, ist mittlerweile abgefallen, aber die Keile stecken noch fest zwischen den Zinken.
Früher wurden mit diesem Prinzip Heugabeln hergestellt. Manche Bauern haben so sogar lebende junge Bäume “gegabelt”, sie mit den Keilen verwachsen lassen und hatten dann eine starke Heugabel.

Soviel zum Gabel-Machen. Wünsche euch noch einen schönen Tag! 🙂

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Lots of Reasons: Nursing and Food

As I was sitting in front of the computer, nursing my little one I stumbled upon a post by Devadeva whose blog I like to read. It was about nursing and who many people nowadays don’t nurse their children.
Anyway, I was thinking about how much I enjoy nursing and have come up with 10 good reasons why one should nurse one’s baby. If anyone can think of more – please comment!
1. It’s cozy!
2. If you have a good diet (like me 😉 ), your baby will get all it needs and more in the milk
3. Breast-milk changes with the needs of your baby: Be it the amount or what’s in it – it adjusts to meet your baby’s needs.
4. If your baby gets hungry at night and he sleeps in your bed – just roll over and give him the nipple! (He doesn’t even have to wake up for it!)
5. It’s sooo cozy!
6. It feels nice. 🙂
7. For all you ladies out there who want to loose some weight after pregnancy (not me): Breast-feeding lets you lose your excess pounds very gently.
8. No extra work preparing the milk (unlike formula).
9. The baby loves it!
10. Gives you some time to just sit and relax (or watch TV, read a book, surf the Sabjimata site…)

Now if you like good reasons and you want to have 90 of them why you should buy organic food, here is something for you! (In German, sorry!)

Now about the food… I went shopping today (meaning, I went 100 m down the road to the farmer’s) and got lots of yummy things and couldn’t resist cooking up a feast for myself and baby-man (no one else here tonight):
I had a nice oat soup (from leftover breakfast oats), brown rice with steamed Swiss chard, carrots and creamed mushrooms, leftover salad from last night’s dinner, leftover apple crisp from yesterday and a liter of mulled apple juice (organic apple juice, orange peels, fennel seeds, star anise, cinnamon, cloves). Now I’m fat and happy.

My rice, by the way, is usually cooked with seaweed. That has several reasons:
1. People say the rice cooks faster with the seaweed (never noticed
2. Seaweed is extremely good for you:  Susun Weed writes in “Healing Wise” that seaweed is:
“protective, anti-radiation, anti-cancer, anti-oxidant, anti-toxic, anti-rheumatic, antibiotic, antibacterial, alterative
nutritive, trace mineral supplement, cardio-tonic, rejuvenative, aphrodisiac
mucilaginous, emollient, demulcent, aperient, anti-constipative, diuretic
anti-stress, analgesic, calmative, anti-pyretic”
Any more questions? Ok, here a few things that stay in mind easier:
– It has the ability of drawing heavy metals out of your body and prevents damage from chemicals, certain kinds of radioactivity and heavy metals
-It halts infections and stimulates your immune system
-It gives you optimal nutrition, helps offset stress, helps lower cholesterol levels, boost stamina and “even ease sore joints”.
Well, what are you waiting for? Eat some seaweed!

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

So much to do – so little time

Wow, a lot happened since I last wrote!

I started the clean the garden up for winter by taking the dead tomato and cucumber plants out of the beds and pruning the currants. Three of our currant bushes are at least 10 years old (probably older!) and have not been taken care of for the last two years. So it was high time for pruning.
Also, the indoor garden was planted. We have a plant table in the living room in front of an East facing window. The table is currently occupied by lots of tobacco plants (no, I don’t smoke), an Indigo plant and a plant which has a pretty flower, but I don’t know the name. Maybe I’ll post a picture some time.The tobacco plants were pretty small when I took them inside – the tallest ones were maybe 10 cm. Now the tallest ones are around 25 cm and flowering!

So, the windowsill garden. It’s on a table in front of a South facing window, but also gets plenty of light from an East facing window. Nevertheless, I might have to install a plant light as the plantlings are getting a spindly and stretch towards the window.
Here are some pictures:

Part of our indoor "garden" with lettuce seeds

Part of our indoor garden with lettuce seeds

The lettuce is sprouting!

The lettuce is sprouting!

No, I didn't sit in your little garden bed, says the cat. I don't believe her...

"No, I didn't sit in your little garden bed", says the cat. I don't believe her....

Wow, chickadee invasion! Good thing I'm inside....

Wow, chickadee invasion! Good thing I'm inside!

And a chick-chick here, and a chick-chick there, chickadees chickadees everywhere!

And a chick-chick here, and a chick-chick there, chickadees chickadees everywhere!

And another chickadee

And another chickadee

Chickachick even pecking away at our wall

Chickachicks even pecking away at our wall

The chickadees stayed one afternoon, pecking at everything in sight. Our big cat decided
to stay inside until they were gone.

That same afternoon we went for a goat walk:

Some people have goaties in their faces, some have them on a leash

Some people have goaties in their faces, some have them on a leash

We saw interesting tracks. Nadine guesses that this here was a badger. Any other ideas?

We saw interesting tracks. Nadine guesses that this here was a badger. Any other ideas?

Ok, this is an easy one! Who made the track?

Ok, this is an easy one! Who made the track?

I'm sure the pros can also tell how old this is. I sure can't.

And a close-up

There also was pretty foliage

There also was pretty foliage

Think pink! ...or tinder

Think pink! ...or tinder

Since those events we had visitors, went to our little boy’s first concert (Geoff Berner played Khlezmer music), baked a lot of bread (which tastes way better than commercial bread!), harvested lots of apples (and dried some of them) and and and… More next time!

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized